Non-invasive identification of dyed textiles by using VIS-NIR FORS and hyperspectral imaging techniques

  • Greta Peruzzi Istituto di Fisica Applicata “Nello Carrara” del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IFAC-CNR), via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (FI) https://orcid.org/0000-0002-6433-9738
  • Costanza Cucci Istituto di Fisica Applicata “Nello Carrara” del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IFAC-CNR), via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (FI) https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8534-7465
  • Marcello Picollo Istituto di Fisica Applicata “Nello Carrara” del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IFAC-CNR), via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (FI) https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1012-6048
  • Franco Quercioli 2 Istituto Nazionale di Ottica (INO-CNR), via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (FI) https://orcid.org/0000-0002-7844-4686
  • Lorenzo Stefani Istituto di Fisica Applicata “Nello Carrara” del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IFAC-CNR), via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (FI)
Keywords: Natural dyes, wool fibers, FORS, hyperspectral imaging, textiles, non-invasive

Abstract

Natural dyes have been utilized since ancient times to produce colorfull garments and, at the same time, each culture has developped its own traditional designs and techniques during the centuries. Hence, in order to accomplish a proper conservation program of these artefacts, it is fundamental the importance of studying the used dyes on historic textiles. Traditionally, the identification is carried out through invasive or micro-invasive techniques such as HPLC or Raman-SERS. However, a first screening using non-invasive approaches, that could tentatively identify some of the dyes in a contactless mode, is strongly reccommended. The present study focuses on the application of non-invasive spectroscopic techniques, namely FORS and hyperspectral imaging in the visible and near infrred range, for the identification of dyes on textiles. Twelve natural dyestuffs (twelve from plant, two insect dyes and a lichen) and three mordants (KAl(SO4)2, CuSO4 ∙ 5H2O, FeSO4 ∙ 7H2O) were selected and combined to create a set of wool samples whose reflectance spectra, acquired using FORS technique, were the basis for a spectral database. The same set was used to test the Specim IQ hyperspectral camera, with positive results for a non-invasive investigation on wider areas. The application of Spectral Angle Mapping (SAM) gave the possibility to map directly on the image pixel with similar spectral features. Finally, colorimetric data were acquired with a spectrocolorimeter to obtain chromaticity coordinates.

Author Biographies

Greta Peruzzi, Istituto di Fisica Applicata “Nello Carrara” del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IFAC-CNR), via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (FI)

Greta Peruzzi - Master student in Conservation Science at Sapienza University in Rome. Her interests involve non-invasive investigation of archaeological and historical textiles using spectroscopic techniques.

Costanza Cucci, Istituto di Fisica Applicata “Nello Carrara” del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IFAC-CNR), via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (FI)

Costanza Cucci - got her Physics “Laurea” and Ph.D. in Conservation Science at the Florence University. Currently she is a researcher at IFAC-CNR. Her research focus is on spectroscopic techniques and data-processing algorithms applied to the fields of cultural heritage, environmental monitoring, and safety food controls.

Marcello Picollo, Istituto di Fisica Applicata “Nello Carrara” del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IFAC-CNR), via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (FI)

Marcello Picollo - Ph.D., is a researcher at IFAC-CNR. His interests include color measurement, Vis-NIR Hyperspectral Imaging, and spot size UV-Vis-IR spectroscopic investigations of 2D polychrome objects.

Franco Quercioli, 2 Istituto Nazionale di Ottica (INO-CNR), via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (FI)

Franco Quercioli - is a senior researcher at the National Institute of Optics - CNR. He is an experimental physicist whose activities have covered the fields of: coherent optics, interferometry, optical metrology, holography, Fourier optics, optical engineering, confocal and non-linear microscopy and biophotonics.

Lorenzo Stefani, Istituto di Fisica Applicata “Nello Carrara” del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IFAC-CNR), via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (FI)

Lorenzo Stefani - is a technician in telecommunications at IFAC-CNR. He is in charge of the development of hardware and software for computer-controlled instrumentation for the non-invasive and in situ study of artworks.

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Published
2021-04-09
How to Cite
Peruzzi, G., Cucci, C., Picollo, M., Quercioli, F. and Stefani, L. (2021) “Non-invasive identification of dyed textiles by using VIS-NIR FORS and hyperspectral imaging techniques”, Cultura e Scienza del Colore - Color Culture and Science, 13(01), pp. 61-69. doi: 10.23738/CCSJ.130207.
Section
Papers